PODCAST: Women and Power

Whether or not you’re joining us in Oxford for the Women & Power conference next week, I hope you’ll check out the National Trust’s Women & Power podcast series. The five-episode series is presented by Kirsty Wark, and features a whole host of great stories from across the Trust, and contributions from lots of different historians. I pop up in all five episodes, talking about Victorian Manchester and the Contagious Diseases Acts (Episode 1), force-feeding (Episode 2), Octavia Hill, violence in Oxford, and the NUWSS pilgrimage (Episode 3, with genuine piano underscoring), the suffragettes as terrorists and the myth of why women really got the vote (Episode 4), and the Six Point Group (Episode 5).

(c) Bodleian

The series is ace, with brilliant on-location sequences at beautiful Wightwick, Killerton, and Osterley (plus some very energetic Incidental Radio Acting), and I haven’t given it the blog love it deserves.  It’s been a lovely soundtrack to writing my keynote for next week’s conference at St Hugh’s, here in Oxford. I look forward to seeing some of you soon. 

P.S. the book of the Women & Power project, with all the info from the series and more, plus pictures, is still available online. You can also check out my episode of Radio 3’s The Essay on Shakespeare and suffrage, and my 2018 podcast episode on suffragette Emily Wilding Davidson and Oxford’s suffrage histories for Women In Oxford’s History. There’s yet more about Shakespeare and the suffragettes in my first book, Shakespeare’s Women and the Fin de Siecle. A trove.

Christopher, Edy, Violet, Margaret & Laura

You know those t-shirts? The white-on-black listed firstnames with the Helvetica ampersand and the cultural references I only understand if it’s the Beatles? This post’s title would make an excellent one.

One great perk of my research for the National Trust was seeing some of my research turned into articles for Trusted Source, their great collaboration with the University of Oxford. If the above content (big houses! Family resemblances! Superiority, chokers, and elderly lesbians in Headgear!) appeals to you, and if, like me, you’re keen for the resurgence of interest in women’s history not to be left in 2k18, click here and find out about My Favourite Historical Lesbians, The Unparalleled Tale Of A Kitchenmaid-Turned-Hungerstriker (scroll right down the page), Britain’s Leading Female Anti-Suffragist, and Essentially A Dynasty Of Awesome Feminists In Wales.

N.B. these are not what the articles are called, because the whole point of the collaboration is to provide scholarly and straightforward introductions to important figures in the history of Trust properties, to be read seriously and with informative effect. But those are the article titles in spirit.