CLAMOROUS VOICE

stage, spires, and Shakespeare

Right. Take a look at these tweets. Watch this space tomorrow morning for news about #RSCWinter13 — The RSC (@TheRSC) January 22, 2013 Some VERY exciting news coming from the RSC tomorrow!!! There will be some smiles on faces, so there will! — dusthouse (@dusthouse) January 22, 2013 and in reply to the above…. @dusthouse …

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I love Hark, a vagrant more than is seemly for someone who won’t read graphic novels and ‘doesn’t like comics’. Every one’s a winner, but this… this is a fucking comic about nineteenth Shakespeare performance history, guys! It’s my DPhil in a line drawing!* I love it.  I include it because it reminds me of …

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2,000 words written today, right on schedule! Also, visitors to the blog seem to have exploded – what you get for mentioning Mr. Tennant, I suppose (or so Google tells me). Can’t decide what I think about the THEdavidtennant spoof on Twitter, but am leaning towards …not very funny. At all. The disclaimer’s much too …

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This week has been a very tough week, but I’m using this post to focus on the awesomeness, MUCH OF WHICH is contained in the photograph above: the RSC Histories company winning THREE Oliviers. The photo is ridiculous in some ways – only Chuk Iwuji, as my friend pointed out, seems to know how to …

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The Shakespeare Birthplace Trust (which also seems to employ most of the RSC’s FOH team!) has announced a Shakespeare Hall of Fame for the Birthday celebrations in April. Twelve names are in, with the thirteenth to be chosen from the poll here. Current inductees are (in chronological order): Ben Jonson, David Garrick, Charles Dickens, Ellen …

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It’s news like the fact that David Tennant has been invalided out of Hamlet with a bad back that makes me wish I was back at work. Nobody who has seen Tennant, much less worked in the same building (even briefly and lowly as I did) could doubt just how hard he works – he never stops working, thinking or running. The man bolts on and offstage. It’s exhausting, even when your only related responsibilities are to stop the audience chasing him backstage (which happened), stealing the props (which happened repeatedly) and thwarting the patrons who inexplicably decided that the time when he’s behind the stalls doing a full costume change (note: this doesn’t happen at the Novello, don’t even try) is when they need to start roaming the auditorium in search of a loo.